About

Station 4 Then

Station 4 was a short lived online gallery and information source based in San Francisco, California from 2007-09.


S4 worked closely with bold serigraph print artists providing a marketing outlet as well as educational hub for those interested in learning about silkscreen printing. 


Unfortunately, this page will be shutting down once the remaining inventory of art prints are gone as the storage space is needed. 

Station 4 Now

Fortunately, a handful of historic, limited edition art prints by Emory Douglas are still available.


Each screen print has been hand numbered + signed by Mr. Douglas and have been stored flat/indoors since the day they were created over a decade ago.


If you would like to purchase from the dwindling stock please feel free to do so below as once they're gone - they are gone.


Cheers, -Marc

About THE PRINTS

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Background

Each silk screened print has been meticulously reproduced by Chuck Sperry of the Firehouse Kustom Rockart Company headquartered in Oakland, California in 2008. The entire limited edition art print series was printed on archival cotton rag paper and each print is signed and numbered by Mr. Douglas.

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More on the Artist

 

In 1967 Emory Douglas became an active member of the Black Panther Party based in San Francisco and quickly became responsible for the design of the Black Panther’s official paper of the party.

“Many of the images may surprise viewers coming to them for the first time. These images, some nearly forty years old, are still as powerful as when Emory Douglas first created them. They are serious and defiant pictures, and they were meant to change the world. Douglas was the Revolutionary Artist of the Black Panther Party and then became its Minister of Culture, part of the national leadership.

Douglas created the overall design of the Black Panther, the party’s weekly newspaper, and oversaw its layout and production until the party’s discontinuance in the early 1980s. During this era Douglas made countless artworks, illustrations, and cartoons, which were reproduced in the paper and distributed as prints, posters, cards and even sculptures.”

Sam Durant, Contemporary Artist / Editor
– from “Black Panther, The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas”
(Rizzoli International Publications, Inc., NY)

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On display at the New Museum in NYC, 2009

 

His visual interpretations of slogans such as, “ALL POWER TO THE PEOPLE” and “YOU CAN MURDER A REVOLUTIONARY, BUT YOU CAN’T MURDER A REVOLUTION” as well as coining and popularizing such terms as “pigs” and “rats” to describe police and politicians made Douglas clearly understand that at that time, the most important thing was to give the people more economic, political and social empowerment.

It has been 40 years since the 1968 Mexican Olympic Games; when the entire world witnessed Tommy Smith and John Carlos symbolically raise their fists in the Black Power Salute. Douglas’ art from this particular time in history, documented the ever-growing civil unrest and undying desire for change.

“Emory Douglas’ work is one of the grand historic moments in the black freedom movement which fused high artistry in images with deep commitment to justice. His art will live forever!”

Cornel West, Princeton University
– from “Black Panther, The Revolutionary Art of Emory Douglas”
(Rizzoli International Publications, Inc., NY)

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They Should Be Paying My Rent

$275.00

($25.00 shipping)

Pay with PayPal or a debit/credit card

“They Should Be Paying My Rent”

Originally published in The Black Panther February 27, 1971 

(c) 2008 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

Reprinted by Chuck Sperry at Firehouse Kustom Rockart Co. 

2 color screenprint 

Dimensions: 20” x 30” (50.8 x 76.2cm) 

Printed on archival cotton rag paper 

Signed and numbered by Emory Douglas 

Edition: 150 

Available: 24

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Our People's Army

$275.00

($25.00 shipping)

Pay with PayPal or a debit/credit card

“Our People’s Army”

Originally published in The Black Panther April 18, 1970 

(c) 2008 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York 

Reprinted by Chuck Sperry at Firehouse Kustom Rockart Co. 

2 color screenprint 

Dimensions: 20” x 30” (50.8 x 76.2cm) 

Printed on archival cotton rag paper 

Signed and numbered by Emory Douglas 

Edition: 150 

Available: 23

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Warning To America - SOLD OUT

$0.00
Pay with PayPal or a debit/credit card

“Warning to America”   
Originally published in The Black Panther June 27, 1970
(c) 2008 Emory Douglas/Artists Rights Society, NY
Reprinted by Chuck Sperry at Firehouse Kustom Rockart Co.  
2 color screenprint
Dimensions: 20” x 30” (50.8 x 76.2cm)
Printed on archival cotton rag paper
Signed and numbered by Emory Douglas
Edition: 150

Available: 0

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Malcolm X by Emory Douglas - SOLD OUT

$0.00
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“Malcolm X”
Printed by Political Gridlock at the Firehouse Kustom Rockart Co.
5 color screenprint
Printed on canvas
Dimensions: 18” x 18” (45.72 x 45.72cm)
Each canvas is incomparable and varies in appearance and detail
Signed and dated by Emory Douglas

Year: 2009
Edition: 13

Available: 0


Note: This canvas series has been long out of print since 2009

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Mona Mohawk by Winston Smith

$325.00

($25.00 shipping)

Pay with PayPal or a debit/credit card

“Mona Mohawk”
Printed by Political Gridlock at the Firehouse Kustom Rockart Co.
5 color screenprint
Printed on canvas
Dimensions: 18” x 18” (45.72 x 45.72cm)
Each canvas is incomparable and varies in appearance and detail
Signed and numbered by Winston Smith

​​Year: 2009​​

Edition​: 13​

Available: 1


Note: This canvas series has been long out of print since 2009 

about Mona Mohawk

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I found myself at a certain stage in my work (around 1979 or 1980) when I began to experiment with using copperplate engravings and trying to create compositions using that style of illustration. I used to go to an antiquarian book store where I’d collect old books and magazines in a little town just north of San Francisco. Since the essence of my montage compositions is the vast ephemera of the past (especially the brightly colored adverts of the Wartime era and the artificially “fabulous Fifties” that followed it), I have been constantly on the look-out for what others discard or leave behind, hoping I can breath new meaning into them for a new (if somewhat more grim) era. In the late ’70s I used to go into this one particular book shop  and yak with the owner, this retired guy who seemed to just be looking after the place more or less as a hobby. He’d usually let me have most of the old mags for 50¢ or a buck each. Sometimes a whole grocery bag of stuff for 5 dollars, whatever I could carry.


One time I walked in and all the shelves had been pulled down as if an earthquake had just struck. A huge mess of battered books lay in a pile on the floor. They were going to tear the old Victorian building down that very day and haul it all off for landfill. He didn’t seemed too riled about it so someone must have made him a pretty good offer just to get their hands on the land so they could build a parking lot or some yuppie condo. I was in shock. He told me I could just take anything I wanted as long as I did it right away. The bulldozers were on their way in a few minutes. I was heartbroken since I could only carry what I could hold in my arms, I had no rucksack or duffel bag with me. So he gave me an old wooden beer box and I began filling it with anything I could find that was from the 19th century that contained illustrations, mostly engravings and traditional imagery.


Within a year or so I saw this awful event play out a few more times; libraries that had no more room for their oldest material, book shops that had no more room for what they used to stock, etc. They would just fill huge steel dumpsters with acres of old books and periodicals. Once I saw them doing this at Fort Mason (near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco), sending tons of books down a shoot right into a giant dumpster. The people dumping it all were surprised that anyone would want these dusty, old things so, again, I found myself struggling to carry away as many old volumes of children’s stories and ancient encyclopedias as I could carry wrapped-up in my old leather jacket. There was so much more there which I had to leave, 19th century world atlases, obsolete technical books, machinery manuals, you name it.


This is happening at ever-increasing rates even today as colleges and universities purge their shelves of old books once they’ve been scanned and listed—then the originals are just so much wood pulp and their value is only a fraction of what the real estate they’re cluttering up is worth. So:  Get rid of it all! Libraries all over the country are actually burning books. What a crime against humanity and against our shared cultural inheritance. Now we are putting all our eggs in one digital basket because some faceless bureaucrats have made a “cost-cutting” decision. The past is for sale.  Hurry, hurry! “While supplies last”. 

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A few years later I found myself living in a remote cabin up in the mountains miles from the nearest paved road, with no running water, no telephone and only kerosene lamps for illumination. Ultimately I came across these 100 year old books with their quaint illustrations and old-fashioned images and I decided to create a series of collages composed exclusively from these sources. (Later I saw some of the exact same pictures as “copyright-free” images sold in art stores and hobby shops as Dover Publications). So I’m not entirely certain where that particular reproduction of Leonardo’s portrait of La Gioconda came from.


Either way, it dawned on me that she could probably stand at least one more artistic alteration, as she has already suffered so many over the centuries—especially in the 20th century when mass image printing became possible and her visage was spread to the four corners of the earth. The lady’s name was Elisabetta Gherardini, the wife of a middle-class Florentine business man named Giacomo del Giacondo; hence the name Mona Lisa (meaning My Lady or as we would put it; M’Lady Lisa), an elegant, serene woman in the waning years of youth who’s deep eyes and subtle smile have enticed the world for generations. Leonardo kept the painting with him all his life. Who knows? Maybe he had a crush on her (or maybe her husband’s cheque bounced).


She is older than the stones among which she rests. Her smooth, plucked eyebrows, the peculiar fashion of the day, create a serene and penetrating gaze. Her timeless, subtitle smile beguiles us. Her calm grace, her inner light, her singularly unique charm entrap and disarm us.


Hers is the face that sunk a thousand ships. She is the quintessential marriage of classical beauty and devil-may-give-a-rat’s ass attitude. With the shock of hair, cut as the fearsome American tribal warriors wore it and a spiky neck collar ringing her throat, as well as a jagged, little safety pin piercing her soft flesh, Mona Mohawk’s delicate hands clutch a scratched and ancient 45 rpm—though it might as well be a snub-nose 45, for all her lethal intent.


In order to create my image of Mona Mohawk I first had to set about destroying Leonardo’s masterpiece. Fortunately all the copperplate engravings of the period from the early 1800’s to the early 1900’s were produced to establish a standard gradation so all illustrations of other illustrations for text books and art books or history books seemed to share the same palate. This meant that interchanging images using engravings as the “data base”, so to speak, allow for each picture that was “modified” to look as though it were born that way in its original form. This opened the door for all manner of artistic absurdities to be perpetrated upon them. Most people probably think I hold Art in very low regard but I actually have every respect for the works of the great Maestri of the past and hope they will indulge my inept re-renderings of their masterpieces, if only in the name of creativity, if nothing else.


I used a dull razor blade to scratch the ink off the page and then re-draw the outlines I wanted to appear. I also used a little bottle of that “white-out” paint, common in schools and offices back before computers became ubiquitous and typewriters were the highest tech equipment available short of a pencil sharpener. 

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By and by, I was able to obliterate enough of the original image and replace it with my sarcastic commentary on what had by then (1983) become a fashion cliché, the punk prerequisite:  the Mohawk. All that was needed were a few additional accouterments such as the safety pin piecing the cheek and the spiky leather neck collar plus a few band pins (in this case my DK logo created years before for Dead Kennedys and the ever-present “four towels” as Biafra always referred to the Black Flag logo).   



For the final “insult to injury” I placed a 45 rpm into Mona Mohawk’s delicate hands. People think I made this up but that was actually a real song by a real band: The band’s name was: The Geeks. And one of my favorites songs they did was called, “Bar-B-Q the Dog!” It was Mark Chambers’ commentary on the last agony of the long, overdone political atrocity known as the Cold War—when the “Russians were coming” and America was always “on the brink of invasion. The lyrics said it all: “They’re gonna get Mom! There gonna get Dad! They’re gonna BAR-B-Q the DOG!!!!!!!!!”


Some things are just too damn weird to be made up. Art imitates life. Life imitates Art. Art imitates Lunch. Fortunately people have always responded positively to the Mona Mohawk image. By 1984 I had made postcards and stickers of it. Later I was able to talk the first manager of Alternative Tentacles Records (Microwave) into making T-Shirts of it. He took a risk but it paid off and Mona Mohawk paid her way in the A.T. catalog. We’ve re-rendered her in several different manifestations over the years, including my favorite, created as a computer collage by my wife, Chick, for the invitation on the occasion of our wedding.


Since Chick herself had had numerous buzz-cuts, Mohawks and colorfully creative punk-inspired hair styles over the prior 13 years we’d known one another, this was entirely appropriate for our wedding, Professor Wavy Gravy presiding at the Washington Square Bar & Grill, an elegant setting not half a block from our home in North Beach. As Chick likes to remind our friends, “We got married in a Bar by a Clown!” (even though it was a very classy bar and Wavy is a very nice clown).


This very special and very limited edition of 13 hand-pulled prints available  exclusively from Station 4, featuring wildly inspired color effects, is the newest and perhaps the most audacious version of Mona Mohawk yet. We’re hoping the spirit of Leonardo is benevolently gazing down on our humble efforts and giving us his blessing in this artistically sincere rendering of his timeless masterpiece.


Over & Out.


Winston Smith
San Francisco
2009 

what buyers have said

Warning To America

Gorgeous! Amazing quality and the perfect size. So excited to give to my partner for Christmas. These prints are so powerful and I’m grateful that they’re being reproduced at this level of quality. -Kate

Warning To America

Thank you for the tracking information. I am very excited to receive the print when it gets here. I first became aware of Emory Douglas after I saw a book full of his prints at a used bookstore in Vermont. I left that shop determined to track down some of his art. So you could imagine how excited I am to finally own a piece that I can hang in my home. Its been like two years in the making!  -Greg   

Complete Set of 3 Prints

Hi Marc, I just got the prints. They are in perfect condition. Thanks, it was a pleasure to deal with you.

All my best

Jacques from France

Our People's Army

It arrived today. It’s quite literally breathtaking. That Emory Douglas has signed it is almost too much. Now I just have to convince my wife that we need a second. 

-Simon 

They Should Be Paying My Rent

I have received the prints. Thank you so much! Will get them framed this weekend.  -Ariel  

Our People's Army

This is an incredibly high quality print on really nice paper! Fits well in a 20x30 inch frame.  -Monica  

Warning To America

Hi Marc,


I bought a print from you yesterday and I am very excited to receive it. I am emailing you to thank you for making those prints with Emory and Chuck. Your prints help preserve Emory’s incredible work, history, and innovation as an artist.


I am currently studying art, illustration, and graphic design as an older student (49) changing careers, and reading about and seeing Emory’s work and history is already influencing my art and activism.


So, again, thank you. And if you speak to Emory in the future, please thank him for me too.


All the Best,
Tad  

SHIPPING + HANDLING

S+H includes postage, handling, insurance, tracking and delivery signature verification.


So your print remains smudge free, gloves are worn at all times when handling the prints which are carefully rolled in brown and tissue paper and taped at one end for stability during transit. Please be careful when opening the tube. The canvases are shipped in an 18” x 18” reinforced box.


Also, someone must be present to sign for the package upon delivery. Combined shipping is available for multiple print purchases.


Please contact to confirm availability + print quantities as the remaining inventory is low. 

Contact

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Station 4

San Francisco, California, United States

Telephone: +1 415 448 9865